School of Anthias over green algae
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Image courtesy of Corel Photography

Kingdom Protista

Members of the Kingdom Protista are the simplest of the eukaryotes. Protistans are an interesting assemblage of organisms classified for what they are not. Protistans lack characteristics shared by plants, fungi, and animals, but they're not bacteria. Essentially, this Kingdom is home for the "leftover" organisms that couldn't be classified elsewhere!

Protists can be unicellular, multicellular or colonial. Some move around and act like animals, others perform photosynthesis like plants, and still others seem to "think" they're fungi! You might not think a tiny one-celled amoeba has much in common with a giant sea kelp, but they're both members of the protist kingdoms.

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Traveling Nitrogen is a fun group game appropriate for the classroom. Players follow nitrogen atoms through living and nonliving parts of the nitrogen cycle. For grades 5-9.

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