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The Spring 2011 issue of The Earth Scientist is focused on modernizing seismology education. Thanks to IRIS, you can download this issue for free as a pdf. Print copies are available in our online store.
This simple cartoon shows general similarities and differences between eukaryote and prokaryote cells.
Image courtesy of Windows to the Universe

Organelles of Eukaryotic Cells

Below is a list of organelles that are commonly found in eukaryotic cells.

Organelle Function
Nucleus The “brains” of the cell, the nucleus directs cell activities and contains genetic material called chromosomes made of DNA.
Mitochondria Make energy out of food
Ribosomes Make protein
Golgi Apparatus Make, process and package proteins
Lysosome Contains digestive enzymes to help break food down
Endoplasmic Reticulum Called the "intracellular highway" because it is for transporting all sorts of items around the cell.
Vacuole Used for storage, vacuoles usually contain water or food. (Are you are thirsty? Perhaps your vacuoles need some water!)
Plant cells also have:
Chloroplasts Use sunlight to create food by photosynthesis
Cell Wall For support
Last modified April 13, 2004 by Lisa Gardiner.

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Windows to the Universe, a project of the National Earth Science Teachers Association, is sponsored in part is sponsored in part through grants from federal agencies (NASA and NOAA), and partnerships with affiliated organizations, including the American Geophysical Union, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Earth System Information Partnership, the American Meteorological Society, the National Center for Science Education, and TERC. The American Geophysical Union and the American Geosciences Institute are Windows to the Universe Founding Partners. NESTA welcomes new Institutional Affiliates in support of our ongoing programs, as well as collaborations on new projects. Contact NESTA for more information. NASA ESIP NCSE HHMI AGU AGI AMS NOAA