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This is the Barringer Meteor Crater in Arizona.
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D. Roddy and LPI

Impact Craters on Earth

Compared with other planets, impact craters are rare surface features on Earth. There are two main reasons for the low number of craters. One is that our atmosphere burns up most meteoroids before they reach the surface. The other reason is that Earth's surface is continually active and erases the marks of craters over time. The picture is the Barringer Meteorite Crater found in Arizona. It was probably formed about 50,000 years ago when an iron meteorite struck the Earth's surface. The crater is about 1200 meters in diameter and 200 meters deep. Many other large craters are found in Australia, Canada and Africa.


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Windows to the Universe, a project of the National Earth Science Teachers Association, is sponsored in part is sponsored in part through grants from federal agencies (NASA and NOAA), and partnerships with affiliated organizations, including the American Geophysical Union, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Earth System Information Partnership, the American Meteorological Society, the National Center for Science Education, and TERC. The American Geophysical Union and the American Geosciences Institute are Windows to the Universe Founding Partners. NESTA welcomes new Institutional Affiliates in support of our ongoing programs, as well as collaborations on new projects. Contact NESTA for more information. NASA ESIP NCSE HHMI AGU AGI AMS NOAA