Fahrenheit Scale

The Fahrenheit scale (°F) was the first widely used temperature scale. It was developed in the early 1700s by G. Daniel Fahrenheit. The zero point of the Fahrenheit scale is attained by mixing equal parts of water, ice, and salt.

Fahrenheit set the number 32 at the freezing point of water. He set the boiling point of water to 212 on his scale.

The Fahrenheit scale is still used in the United States to measure temperatures at or near the Earth's surface. The rest of the world uses the Celsius scale.



Fahrenheit Scale

The Fahrenheit scale (°F) was the first widely used temperature scale. It was developed in the early 18th century by G. Daniel Fahrenheit. The zero point of the Fahrenheit scale is attained by mixing equal parts of water, ice, and salt.

Fahrenheit set the number 32 at the freezing point of water. He set the boiling point of water to 212 on his scale. 180 equal divisions or degrees (°) are marked on the Fahrenheit scale between the freezing and boiling points of water.

The Fahrenheit scale is still used in the United States to measure temperatures at or near the Earth's surface. The rest of the world uses the Celsius scale.




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