The Stratosphere

The stratosphere is the second layer of the atmosphere. The the temperature in the stratosphere goes up the higher you go up.

Ozone causes the temperature to go up. It absorbs dangerous light from the Sun and converts it to heat.

The stratosphere is located above the troposphere.
This is a picture, taken from an airplane, of clouds in the stratosphere.
Click on image for full size (25K GIF)

Stratospheric Ozone, The Protector content and activities from Project LEARN

Injecting Sulfate Particles into Stratosphere Could Have Drastic Impact on Earth's Ozone Layer

The Stratosphere

In the Earth's stratosphere, the temperature increases with altitude. On Earth, ozone causes the increasing temperature in the stratosphere. Ozone is concentrated around an altitude of 25 kilometers. The ozone molecules absorb dangerous kinds of sunlight, which heats the air around them.

The stratosphere is located above the top of the the troposphere.
This is a picture, taken from an airplane, of stratospheric clouds.
Click on image for full size (25K GIF)

Stratospheric Ozone, The Protector content and activities from Project LEARN

Injecting Sulfate Particles into Stratosphere Could Have Drastic Impact on Earth's Ozone Layer

The Stratosphere

In the Earth's stratosphere, the temperature increases with altitude (as opposed to the troposphere, where it gets colder with altitude).

The increasing temperature in the stratosphere is caused by the presence of a layer of ozone near an altitude of 25 kilometers. The ozone molecules absorb high-energy UV rays from the sun, which warm the atmosphere at that level.

The terrestrial stratosphere is the region between the tropopause, or the end of the troposphere, and the level at which the maximum warming due to the presence of ozone takes place, which is at an altitude of about 50 kilometers.


This is a picture, taken from an airplane, of stratospheric clouds.
Click on image for full size (25K GIF)

Stratospheric Ozone, The Protector content and activities from Project LEARN

Injecting Sulfate Particles into Stratosphere Could Have Drastic Impact on Earth's Ozone Layer


Last modified May 22, 2008 by Becca Hatheway.
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