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Hands On Mineral Identification helps you to identify over 14,500 minerals! By M. Darby Dyar, Ph.D. See our DVD collection.

Make It Rain!

Here's a neat experiment that makes rain in a jar. You will need a parent or teacher, a jar with a metal lid, 1 cup of water, a hammer, a nail, ice cubes, and salt.

Have your parent or teacher in the room to make sure you don't get hurt! Use the hammer and nail to make 5 dimples on the inside of the metal lid. Don't poke holes through the lid, just little indentations. Then boil one cup of water. You can either do this on stove in a pot or use a bunsen burner. Please use pot holders so you don't burn yourself!

Pour the boiling water into the jar. Place the metal lid upside down on top of the jar, completely covering the mouth of the jar. Place 3-4 ice cubes into the lid. Add a little bit of cold water and a pinch or two of salt and stir. Make sure the mouth of the jar remains completely covered by the lid.

Wait a few minutes and watch as drops of rain start to fall from the lid to the water below.

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The Fall 2009 issue of The Earth Scientist, which includes articles on student research into building design for earthquakes and a classroom lab on the composition of the Earth’s ancient atmosphere, is available in our online store.

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Windows to the Universe, a project of the National Earth Science Teachers Association, is sponsored in part by the National Science Foundation and NASA, our Founding Partners (the American Geophysical Union and American Geosciences Institute) as well as through Institutional, Contributing, and Affiliate Partners, individual memberships and generous donors. Thank you for your support! NASA AGU AGI NSF